Letort Spring Run Legal Designation

The Letort Spring Run is governed by the Letort Spring Run Scenic River Act, enacted in 1988.[1]

 

The Act classifies the segments of the Run as follows:

(1) LeTort Spring Run main stem–State Route 34 bridge to abandoned Reading Railroad bridge adjacent to LeTort Park including Left Branch from source to main stem–2.5 miles–Pastoral.

(2) LeTort Spring Run main stem–Abandoned Reading Railroad bridge adjacent to LeTort Park to Post Road including Mill Race from Henderson Avenue to main stem–2.5 miles–Modified Recreational.

(3) LeTort Spring Run main stem–Post Road to the confluence with the Conodoguinet Creek–2.6 miles–Pastoral.

32 P.S. § 820.103.

 

Pastoral rivers are:

[T]those rivers or sections of rivers which are free of impoundments excepting historic or restored mill dams. Diversions or withdrawals may exist to support agricultural activities such as agricultural ponds. The shorelines or watersheds may support a full range of farm or farm-related activities, so long as these activities do not conflict with the pastoral nature of the landscape.

32 P.S. § 820.24(b)(2).

 

Modified recreational rivers are:

[T]hose rivers or sections of rivers in which the flow may be regulated by control devices located upstream. Low dams are permitted in the reach so long as they do not increase the river beyond bank-full width. These reaches are used for human activities which do not substantially interfere with public use of the streams or the enjoyment of their surroundings.

32 P.S. § 820.24(b)(5).

 

Finally, pastoral rivers are:

[T]hose rivers or sections of rivers which are free of impoundments excepting historic or restored mill dams. Diversions or withdrawals may exist to support agricultural activities such as agricultural ponds. The shorelines or watersheds may support a full range of farm or farm-related activities, so long as these activities do not conflict with the pastoral nature of the landscape.
32 P.S. § 820.24(b)(3).

These classifications serve to protect the aesthetic and recreational value of Pennsylvania’s rivers and to “assure the people of this generation and their descendants the opportunity to refresh their spirits with the aesthetic and recreational qualities of unspoiled streams.”[2]

The Fish and Boat Commission has classified sections of the Letort from 300 yards above the bridge on Bonnybrook Road to the Mouth of the Run as Class A Wild Trout Waters.[3] This indicates the Letort is a stream that supports a population of naturally producing trout of sufficient size and abundance to support a long-term and rewarding sport fishery with no stocking.

[1] 32 P.S. § 820.103.

[2] 32 P.S. § 820.22.

[3] Pennsylvania Fish & Boat Commission, Class A Wild Trout Waters, available at https://www.fishandboat.com/Fish/PennsylvaniaFishes/Trout/Documents/classa.pdf.